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Book review: The Singing God

April 26, 2013

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Books about the love of God are not uncommon these days. But with The Singing God, author Sam Storms offers a unique perspective on the affection of the Almighty towards his people. The title of the book is taken from Zephaniah 3:16-17: On that day they will say to Jerusalem, “Do not fear, Zion; do […]

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Book review: Vanished

January 1, 2013

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Vanished, a new romantic suspense novel by Irene Hannon, gets off to a chilling start. Investigative reporter Moira Harrison accidentally kills a woman who runs out in front of her car on a dark and rainy back-country road. Or does she? As the title conveys, the accident victim disappears without a trace. In fact, no […]

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The straw man behind A Year Of Biblical Womanhood

November 13, 2012

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Hay

The American Heritage Dictionary defines a straw man as “A made-up version of an opponent’s argument that can easily be defeated. To accuse people of attacking a straw man is to suggest that they are avoiding worthier opponents and more valid criticisms of their own position.” During the election season, straw men were everywhere. Candidates […]

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Sometimes you can judge a book by its cover

November 1, 2012

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RaiseTheRoof

It’s been said that “you can’t judge a book by its cover.” And I think there’s much to commend that perspective. But I think one new book invites critique in a way that can’t be ignored. Rachel Held Evans is a smart and talented writer. But as a Christian blogger who seems generally intent at […]

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Book review: Crazy Dangerous

June 7, 2012

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Andrew Klavan is crazy good. I mean, the author is very adept at writing stories where characters have mental problems. His 1993 novel The Animal Hour follows a narrator through chilling dangers as the reader gradually understands the depths of her madness. The story is quite shocking and violent, so I wouldn’t recommend it generally. […]

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Book review: Eye of the Sword

May 23, 2012

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A brave knight harboring a forbidden love with a strong-willed princess. A doomed quest to hold off a war between neighboring kingdoms. An unseen villain, poisoning the landscape with relentless evil. Sure, Eye of the Sword is pregnant with fantasy archetypes, but that doesn’t stop the novel from providing an engrossing tale for young adults. […]

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Book review: Beckon

May 21, 2012

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Would you like to live for ever? How much would you be willing to sacrifice to have an unlimited number of days on this earth? Those are two of the questions characters wrestle with in Beckon by Tom Pawlik. The thriller largely takes place in two settings: deep within the earth in tunnels and caves […]

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What I’m reading: The Realms Underneath

February 20, 2012

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A number of months ago, I read my first book by author Stephen Lawhead, noted for fiction rooted in Britain’s misty and mysterious tales of yore. My review of the novel is here. I’ve just started a new book by his son, Ross Lawhead, called The Realms Thereunder. I’m only a chapter in, so it’s […]

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Book review: Muscular Faith

August 24, 2011

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Ben Patterson gently challenges couch potato Christians to embark on a gritty spiritual adventure in his book Muscular Faith. Subtitled How to strengthen your heart, soul and mind for the only challenge that matters, the book explores how to discover the excitement, passion, and thrill of being fully and vigorously alive. Muscular Faith is a […]

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Book review: Primal

August 23, 2011

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Mark Batterson is the lead pastor for National Community Church in Washington, D.C., a trendy congregation with nine services in five locations. So you’d expect that he’d champion an innovative approach to the Christian faith. But in his new book Primal, the author takes us on a counter-intuitive journey back in time two thousand years. […]

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